Baked Carrot Leek Frittata

Baked Carrot Leek Frittata
Among the dishes I enjoyed eating back when I was in kindergarten was the frittata.

It’s actually the only food I remember they made in that canteen, except for the letter soup served with individually wrapped cream cheese. I remembered and rediscovered the pleasure of eating this dish when I began cooking more seriously about five years ago. I found this baked version on cookieandkate and it’s great because it’s so easy and fuss free that I will surely be making it again and again. Depending on the season and on what veggies I find, it’ll be fun to test all those possible flavour combinations.

 

 

Baked Carrot Leek Frittata

 

150 g carrots peeled and ends cut off

140 g leeks

1 tbsp. butter

6 eggs

60 g grated Gruyere

a generous splash of cream

2 tsp. thyme

Salt and pepper

 

Recipe:

Heat oven at 200°C.

Julienne the carrots either with a peeler or by using a knife. If using a knife, cut the carrot into about 4-5 cm sections. Slice lengthwise one side of the carrot. Place cut side of carrot down so it doesn’t roll when cutting. Cut carrot into thin slices lengthwise. Stack a few slices on top of each other and slice again lengthwise. You will end up with thin matchsticks. Then julienne the leeks. Again, cut into 4-5 cm sections, divide in half lengthwise and (always lengthwise) thinly slice.

Pace a pan on a medium heat and add the butter, once melted add the vegetables, thyme, salt and pepper and cook for about 5 min, or until just softened. Once done set aside to cool a little.

In a bowl break the eggs and add the cream, the grated cheese, salt and pepper.

Line a baking dish with oven paper and start by placing the vegetables, on top pour the egg mixture. Move the vegetables a little around to make sure the egg is evenly distributed.

Bake for 20-25 min, once the center of the frittata is a little puffed up and bouncy, it’s ready.

2 thoughts on “Baked Carrot Leek Frittata

    • Thanks john. A frittata is something I don’t think of often enough, and yet it’s so easy and versatile. With your Italian heritage, I bet you make a great Bartolini version too 🙂

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